Quarter of teenagers eyeing jobs tackling climate crisis

Almost a quarter UK teenagers believe they are likely to consider a career tackling climate change, a YouGov survey of over 1,000 15-18-year-olds has uncovered.

web_Greta-Thunberg_shutterstock_1401066536-(1).png

The findings also show that almost three in five believe that climate change is the biggest problem facing the world today, while three-quarters cited Greta Thunberg as an influence.

Moreover, it was found that 26% of young people believe that scientists have the biggest role to play in addressing the climate crisis.

The Royal Society of Chemistry, which commissioned the survey, called on educators to seize the opportunity and boost the number of pupils studying STEM careers.

“There is an opportunity to fulfil that ambition, but only if we provide better support and inspiration for the next generation of climate scientists," said director of education and professional practice, Sarah Robertson.

“It’s incredibly encouraging to see so many young people keen to consider a career which can help tackle some of the world’s most pressing problems – and that it was Greta Thunberg, a young person herself, who has inspired this interest.”

Various polls have shown climate change shoot up the list of concerns facing the UK public in recent years, with one suggesting that it would influence how most people vote at elections.

Another survey of millennial and Generation Z workers by BRITA UK found that the majority would stay at a company longer if it demonstrates strong sustainability credentials.

A massive 86% of the respondents born between the early 80s and mid-00s said they would remain with an employer if it reports on how it is lowering its environmental impact.

Having an eco-friendly building was the most valued corporate social responsibility goal, cited by 46%, followed by health and wellbeing programmes, mentioned by 45%.

“We all must capitalise on young people’s interests in addressing the climate crisis and demonstrate how they themselves can make the difference through informed career choices," Robertson added.

 

Image credit ©Shutterstock

Author: 

Chris Seekings is a reporter for TRANSFORM

Back to Top